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Write On: 'Arthur the King' Writer Michael Brandt

March 11, 2024
4 min read time
Writer Michael Brandt is no stranger to the big and small screen.
 
Having written such thrilling films like 3:10 to Yuma, Wanted, 2 Fast 2 Furious and Catch That Kid, he is also the co-creator of NBC’s Chicago Fire, Chicago Med, Chicago P.D. and Chicago Justice. His latest film, which he adapted from the book, "Arthur: The Dog Who Crossed the Jungle to Find a Home," is a film about friendship and survival. The film stars Mark Wahlberg and Simu Liu. 
 
Final Draft sat down with Brandt to find out how this story of an adventure racing athlete who goes on a 435-mile journey through the jungle with his newfound friend, Arthur the dog, came to life. “Producer, Tucker Tooley, said, 'Here's this book. ESPN has done the story on this guy, but I'm not sure it's for you,'" said Brandt. "Meaning he didn't think I'd be into it. He gave me the one-line, and I said, "That sounds amazing.'” Brandt watched the documentary and within two days, he was in. 
 
We sat down with Brandt to hear about this heart-warming true story and how he brought it to the big screen. Listen to hear the full interview.  
 
SPOILER ALERT: The podcast contains important details about the film's plot. 
 

 

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